Accessing a HostGator SVN repository via SVN+SSH on Windows

Accessing a HostGator SVN repository via SVN+SSH on Windows This information should be helpful to anyone trying to access an svn repository stored on a remote (shared) server which does not expose an svn server. My host is HostGator (good speeds, reliable ssh, cgi-only, MyISAM-only, decent support, non-existent knowledgebase). HostGator runs SSH over port 2222… Read More Accessing a HostGator SVN repository via SVN+SSH on Windows

X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff header

Over the past two months, we’ve received significant community feedback that using a new attribute on the Content-Type header would create a deployment headache for server operators. To that end, we have converted this option into a full-fledged HTTP response header. Sending the new X-Content-Type-Options response header with the value nosniff will prevent Internet Explorer from MIME-sniffing a response away from the declared content-type.

For example, given the following HTTP-response:

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Content-Length: 108
Date: Thu, 26 Jun 2008 22:06:28 GMT
Content-Type: text/plain;
X-Content-Type-Options: nosniff

This page renders as HTML source code (text) in IE8.

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Proxy Authentication with Squid

Users will be authenticated if squid is configured to use proxy_auth ACLs.

Browsers send the user’s authentication credentials in the Authorization request header.

If Squid gets a request and the http_access rule list gets to a proxy_auth ACL, Squid looks for the Authorization header. If the header is present, Squid decodes it and extracts a username and password.

If the header is missing, Squid returns an HTTP reply with status 407 (Proxy Authentication Required). The user agent (browser) receives the 407 reply and then prompts the user to enter a name and password. The name and password are encoded, and sent in the Authorization header for subsequent requests to the proxy. Also see this example Authorization Header from .htaccess files.

NOTE: The name and password are encoded using “base64” (See section 11.1 of RFC 2616). However, base64 is a binary-to-text encoding only, it does NOT encrypt the information it encodes. This means that the username and password are essentially “cleartext” between the browser and the proxy. Therefore, you probably should not use the same username and password that you would use for your account login.

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